Organizer

Nikolaus Rajewsky, Barbara Treutlein

Other Organizers

Karen B. Avraham, Omri Wurtzel
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Location

Tel Aviv
IL
Category

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Date

May 31 2020 - Jun 01 2020

Time

All of the day

Labels

SCOG related event

Minerva-Gentner Symposium Single Cell Analysis: From Development to Disease

This conference is co-organized by SCOG-partners Nikolaus Rajewsky and Barbara Treutlein and several SCOG partners and LifeTimers are among the speakers.

 

Synopsis:

A forum for biologists, methods developers and computational modellers interested in understanding biology at single cell resolution

Single Cell Analysis is transforming many areas of biological research. We are organizing a Minerva-Gentner Symposium that encompasses questions spanning human development, health and disease, and their study using new single-cell resolution approaches. Cell populations are highly heterogeneous. Therefore, in order to decipher physiology and pathology, we need to dissect the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic states of single cells rather than the average of a population of cells. The powerful combination of quantitative in-depth transcriptome analysis of a large number of individual cells, in conjugation with information about their proteomic, lipidomic and metabolic profiles, as well as spatial organization, is a key determinant in understanding cellular fate and behavior. Through many applications, including single cell genome sequencing, single cell transcriptomics, and single cell epigenetic profiling approaches, the genetic and functional properties of individual cells can be characterized in their native conditions, resulting in a deeper understanding of a wide spectrum of research fields such as health, biomedicine, biotechnology, systems biology, food security and agriculture. These groundbreaking approaches are already transforming research and will add to our ability to understand human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and sensory diseases.
German and Israel institutions have world-leading research programs that pioneer the use of single cell resolution methods. Twenty-four Israeli and twelve German scientists will be speaking at this two-day symposium on the Tel Aviv University campus.